Coyotes are known as a lot of things: dangerous, predators, vermin and target practice.  In 2009 the Saskatchewan government instituted a program which placed a $20 bounty on the heads of every coyote in the province; the program was incredibly popular, but some hunters abused the system by killing coyotes in other provinces and claiming the Saskatchewan bounty.

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Two students from Carry the Kettle First Nation, located about 100 kilometres east of Regina, took home first prize at the Saskatchewan First Nations Science Fair March 10 to 11 in Saskatoon.

 

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TH- kelly services The job market can be fairly tough and finding the right work environment can seem quite impossible. With employment and recruitment agencies the job search has been made easier and quicker.  Companies can be very selective on whom they hire and having an agency speak up for you can come in handy. Many people are skeptical when it comes to seeking help from an employment agency. 

“In Saskatchewan a lot of people don’t know what we do, so were trying to raise the awareness of what an agency does a lot of people come in thinking were going to charge them a fee,” said Linda Langelier, President executive and search consultant at Employment Network Canada Inc.

    

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A growing decline of special education programs and teachers in schools is sparking a different kind of learning. 

 

Joanne Oszust, a language arts teacher at St. Timothy School, said that the change from a congregated to an inclusive setting is a promising one for students with learning disabilities. Beginning in 2001, special needs students were no longer being taught in their own classroom within the school, and are now regarded as mainstream students instead of special class students. However, they are still taken out for core subjects such as math and English, which Oszust thinks is positive.

 

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Janine Windolph

The school board for Bedford Road Collegiate in Saskatoon passed a motion to change the school sport’s team name and logo on March 4, 2014.

 

Saskatoon Public School Board chair Ray Morrison voted in favour in changing the name, the Redmen, and the logo, a picture of a braided First Nations warrior with feathers in his hair.

 

“As a board we thought long and hard. In my view, based on the information gathered, we need to find a way to move forward rather than getting stuck on the past,” said Morrison.

 

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On Jan 18 an oil spill at Enbridge Pipeline, Inc.’s Rowatt Station startled Regina; the spill wasn’t as damaging the Kalamazoo oil spill, but the disaster’s shadow lingers over a province where oil and gas could be the economic future. 

 

Although some of the oil was on a resident’s farm, Enbridge publicly says there’s “no impact to the public, wildlife or waterways."  But it’s not enough to assuage concerns from some citizens.

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Meka Okochi in his office

The Saskatchewan Urban Municipality Association is holding its 109th annual convention next week and this year’s theme is “Strength from Many People”.

 

CRA award winner, world-class long distance runner and former Ethiopian refugee, Ted Jaleta will be the convention's keynote speaker.

 

Jaleta is hoping to inspire the delegation by telling them his life story. He wants people to know about the great potential Saskatchewan and Canada has to offer immigrants.

 

Jaleta has lived in Saskatchewan for 32 years and will be sharing some of the things he has done to immerse himself into Canadian society.

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