Wes Pearce

By Caitlin Brezinski

The shift towards online trends in education has led to a debate as to whether or not online courses are beneficial for professors and students. Greg Bawden, an instructional designer who develops online courses, says that online courses have a positive effect on students who may not otherwise participate in class.  

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Andrew Cameron stands in front of his board of equations, getting ready to add more numbers. Photo by Victoria Dinh

Recently, the federal government has made quite a stir with the financial cutbacks to research programs across Canada. According to CBC, over the past five years more than 2,000 scientists have been let go and hundreds of programs and research facilities have lost their funding. However, at the beginning of January, it was announced that researchers at the University of Regina were rewarded more than $400,000 in grants from a combination of federal and provincial funding. This begs the question: what is so special about this particular research?

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Zeinab

Diversity is common around Regina and, yet, how much do we really know about the different cultures that surround us in our multicultural society? Walking down the halls of the university, there are a variety of faces that pass by. Among the chaos of students rushing from class to class, do you ever pause and think, "Is what I know of this person in front of me a fact or a stereotype?"

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Teeradat Supap and head engineer Don Gelowitz in the Pilot Plant control room at the U of R International Centre for Carbon Capture. Photo by Sarah Ferguson.

by Sarah Ferguson

 

When it comes to carbon emissions, Saskatchewan occupies a significant area on the world map.

 

The province has the highest carbon footprint in Canada, according to Jim Harding, a former environmental sciences professor at the University of Waterloo. “The global average per capita is four tonnes per person. Saskatchewan’s average per person is 72 tonnes.”

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Students at the Aboriginal Career Centre's career day chat with potential employers. Photo by Jamie Fischer.

Students at the Aboriginal Career Centre's career day chat with potential employers. Photo by Jamie Fischer.

by Jamie Fischer

 

The main floor of the University of Regina’s Research and Innovation Centre was transformed on Nov. 23 for the Aboriginal Career Centre’s career day. Displays were up, business cards were exchanged, and some students may have met their future employers.

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by Brigid McNutt

Two Canadian researchers have sequenced the genome of Cannibas sativa in an attempt to break through the plant’s stigma and use it to its full potential .

 

Due to its past legal status, studies on Cannabis sativa—the plant that produces industrial hemp and marijuana—have lagged behind other plants.   Though it is used as a source of material, nutrition, and medicine, the plant’s association with marijuana has tainted its reputation, said Jon Page, a University of Saskatchewan plant biochemist and co-leader of the study.

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