by Cheyenne Geyson

It's the "breast” fundraiser in the city. The 19th annual CIBC Run For The Cure was held Sunday, Oct. 3. It is one of the largest single-day volunteer run fundraisers in support of breast cancer awareness in the country.“The statistics sort of speak for themselves. One in nine women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. So for (the University community), if they haven’t had (an experience with breast cancer) in their lifetime yet, it is something that they will unfortunately probably experience at some point,” said Regina Run media coordinator Whitney Brhelle.

Those involved collect pledges to go toward the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. Funds raised are used for awareness, education, diagnosis and treatment initiatives.

Participants walked or ran a one- or a five-km course. Registration is open to both individuals and teams. There is no minimum pledge amount required, but participants are encouraged to attempt to raise at least $150 to cover the costs of their registration.

“It’s really something that anyone can do. You’re not limited by if you’re a runner or not. We get all types and ages of people who come out to partake in the activities,” said Brhelle. “It’s more important than ever that young people are getting involved and trying to be proactive
in raising awareness and (increasing) education.”

Regina resident Josh DeCorby, 23, took part in the run for the first time this year.

“It’s a great cause,” said DeCorby about his reasons for running. “I’ve felt the effects of cancer in my family, so I was extra motivated to run.”

As time runs out before the big race, some businesses in Regina have been giving an extra push to remind potential participants to register, or those already registered to kick up their fundraising a notch.

Rawlco Radio annually partners with Run organizers in Regina to raise awareness in a unique way.

Their “bra bridge,” made up entirely of donated brassieres, was on display on the Albert Street Bridge from 6 to 9 a.m. on Wednesday, September 22. Afterwards, the bras were donated to women’s shelters in the city.

“(Their event) sort of had a double use, where they were creating awareness and helping us build some support,” said Brhelle.

The title sponsor for the event, CIBC, has done fundraising at all their branches across the city, as well as selling merchandise and providing “a tonne of volunteers.”

Last year, 2,100 runners in Regina raised roughly $42,000. Brhelle says that this year, the goal is to raise $45,000.

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